CUCA Port & Policy (12/10/2016)

The first Cambridge University Conservative Association (CUCA) ‘Port & Policy’ meeting this Term took place last night. (Photographs below taken by CUCA and from their Twitter page.) At this event, after having criticised the Osborne economic policy of a painfully slow reduction of the budget deficit, I spoke in favour of much more “austerity”, making the moral and practical case for a massive reduction in the size of the State. Further to this, I argued that it should not be the role of government macroeconomic policy to prevent recessions, especially following unsustainable booms caused by a loose monetary policy. In short, austerity works, and, while unpopular, it is the right thing to do. Other debates had at the meeting were over Grammar Schools and the Single Market.

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How Glorious was the “Glorious Revolution”?

How Glorious was the “Glorious Revolution”?
(Adapted from an address to the 11th meeting of the Property & Freedom Society)
By Keir Martland

I would like to begin by thanking Professor Hoppe and Dr Imre Hoppe for their generosity in inviting me to speak on 2nd September to such an august gathering as the Property and Freedom Society – and at such a young age. The topic of the speech I gave was the so-called Glorious Revolution, although it might as easily have been titled “On Politics and Religion”, so central were these two themes to my own speech. Therefore, at the beginning of this essay I cannot help but recall an anecdote told of G.K. Chesterton. The great man was offered a column by the Illustrated London News Company and he very humbly asked on what he could possibly write for them. Continue reading

‘In Defence of the British Empire’ (2015) – Manchester Debating Union

Reposted from The Libertarian Alliance

On Thursday the 19th February 2015, Sean Gabb and Keir Martland, both members of the Libertarian Alliance Executive Committee, spoke at a debate organised by the Manchester University Student Union on whether the legacy of the British Empire should be regretted. Both spoke against the motion.

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